THE HOLY ROSARY AND SACRED SCRIPTURE

The intention of the Holy Rosary is to help unfold the mysteries contained within the Gospel and come to know God better by meditating upon the Scriptures.  By gaining a better understanding of Scripture and entering into a better relationship with Jesus through the Rosary, one becomes better prepared to enter into communion with Him at Church in the Liturgy of the Word, and the Liturgy of the Eucharist.  A deeper communion with Jesus in our prayer life also assists us to enter more fully into relationship with others in our daily lives.

The primary prayers of the Most Holy Rosary find their origin in Sacred Scripture.  They are the Lord’s Prayer (the Our Father) and the Hail Mary.  The Our Father was taught by Jesus on several occasions in Scripture including Matthew 6:9-13 and Luke 11:2-4. The Hail Mary prayer is composed from the scriptural accounts of the Angelic Salutation to Mary by the Archangel Gabriel, and the blessing offered to Mary by her cousin Elizabeth under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. (Luke 1:28,41-42) 
 

The Lord’s Prayer (The Our Father)

Matthew 6:9-13

"Pray, then, in this way: Our Father who art in Heaven, Hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, On earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For Yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory now and forever. Amen.”

The Hail Mary Prayer

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee.

Luke 1:28

"And coming to her, the Angel said, "Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee." 

Blessed art thou among women, and Blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.


Luke 1:41-42

“And it came to pass, that, when Elisabeth heard the greeting of Mary, the infant leaped in her womb; and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit: And she cried out with a loud voice and said, Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb.”

Luke 1:48

"For he has looked upon his handmaid's lowliness; behold, from now on will all ages shall call me blessed."
 
Holy Mary, Mother of God

Luke 1:43

"And how does this happen to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?”

Pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.


THE SIGNIFICANCE OF PRAYING FOR ONE ANOTHER

I Timothy 2:1-4

"First of all, then, I urge that petitions, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for everyone... This is good, and it pleases God Our Savior, Who wants everyone to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth."

Ephesians 1:15-16

"For this reason, ever since I heard about your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love for all the saints, I have not stopped giving thanks for you, remembering you in my prayers. I keep asking that the God of Our Lord Jesus Christ, the glorious Father, may give you the Spirit of wisdom and revelation, so that you may know him better. I pray also that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints."

Revelation 5:7-8

"He came and took the scroll out of the right hand of the One seated on the throne. When He took the scroll, the four living creatures and the 24 elders fell down before the Lamb. Each one had a harp and gold bowls filled with incense, which are the prayers of the saints."

In many of Paul’s letters, including these ones to Timothy and the Ephesians, we are reminded of the significance of praying for one another to draw into a closer relationship with God.  We believe in the Communion of Saints, which reminds us that our relationships are not limited to our friends and family on earth, but continue beyond the barriers of space and time with our friends and family in Heaven.  Just as we ask those we are closest with on earth for help when we need it, we do the same with those dear ones in Heaven who now pray perfectly before the throne of God.  We see in the above scripture passage in Revelation, that the exhortation to pray for others includes those Saints in Heaven who offer their petitions united with ours before the throne of Our Father.  In a special way we turn to Our Heavenly Mother Mary, to ask her to intercede with her Son for all of our daily needs, but especially at the hour of death when the forces of Good and evil wage war in a final push for our souls. The importance of this plea to be delivered from evil cannot be underestimated, and is expressed in the closing segments of both the Our Father and Hail Mary prayers.

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